Updates from March, 2015 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Ethan Stone 7:39 am on March 23 Permalink  

    Flying & Driving Drone by B Go Beyond. HD 

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  • Ethan Stone 8:44 am on March 17 Permalink  

    SXSW: Do Androids Dream of Being You? 

    Nerval’s Lobster writesIn 2010, Dr. Martine Rothblatt (founder of United Theraputics and Sirius Radio) decided to build a robotic clone of her partner, named Bina. In theory, this so-called “mindclone” (dubbed Bina48) can successfully mimic the flesh-and-blood Bina’s speech and decision-making, thanks to a dataset (called a “mindfile”) that contains all sorts of information about her mannerisms, beliefs, recollections, values, and experiences. But is software really capable of replicating a person’s mind? At South by Southwest this year, Rothblatt is defending the idea of a “mindfile” and clones as a concept that not only works, but already has a “base” thanks to individuals’ social networks, email, and the like. While people may have difficulty embracing something engineered to replicate their behavior, Rothblatt suggested younger generations will embrace the robots: “I think younger people will say ‘My mindclone is me, too.'” Is her idea unfeasible, or is she onto something? Video from Bloomberg suggests that Bina48 still has some kinks to work out before it can pass for human.

     
  • Ethan Stone 5:36 am on March 16 Permalink  

    Algorithm Clones Facial Expressions And Pastes Them Onto Other Faces 

    KentuckyFC writesVarious researchers have attempted to paste an expression from one face on to another but so far with mixed results. Problems arise because these algorithms measure the way a face distorts when it changes from a neutral expression to the one of interest. They then attempt to reproduce the same distortion on another face. That’s fine if the two faces have similar features. But when the faces differ in structure, as most do, this kind of distortion looks unnatural. Now a Chinese team has solved the problem with an algorithm that divides a face into different regions for the mouth, eyes, nose, etc and measures the distortion in each area separately. It then distorts the target face in these specific regions while ensuring the overall proportions remain realistic. At the same time, it decides what muscle groups must have been used to create these distortions and calculates how this would change the topology of the target face with wrinkles, dimples and so on. It then adds the appropriate shadows to make the expression realistic. The result is a way to clone an expression and paste it onto another entirely different face. The algorithm opens the way to a new generation of communication techniques in which avatars can represent the expressions as well as the voices of humans. The film industry could also benefit from an easy way to paste the expressions of actors on to the cartoon characters they voice.

     
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